WhatClinic.com expands to Singapore, leveraging on medical tourism demand

Visual of WhatClinic.com homepage. April 2016.

Healthcare search engine WhatClinic.com, founded in 2007 by founder and CEO Caelen King, is conducing a strategic expansion into the Singapore market.

The healthcare search engine helps patients find and compare private medical clinics is conducting a strategic expansion into the Singapore market, in response to growing demand from private patients. According to the healthcare search engine, it lists 125,000 clinics globally and saw 17.5 million visitors in 2015, with patients able to compare and book treatments across a wide range of elective, self-pay medical treatments.

WhatClinic.com maintains operation in over 127 countries and employs a team of over 60 people in its Dublin headquarters. It maintains offices in the UK, Poland, Brazil and Malaysia.

Following its acquisition of a UK dental booking competitor earlier in the year, the venture will be rolling out real-time booking technology for dental patients as part of the Singapore expansion.

To date, the site lists approximately 600 private doctors, dentists and plastic surgeons on its Singapore pages, and over the past 24 months has observed a 307 per cent increase in enquiries from local patients, with a 97 per cent increase in enquiries from patients looking to get treatment in Singapore.

WhatClinic enquiries. Credit:WhatClinic

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This enquiries originate primarily from Australia, Indonesia and the Philippines, with WhatClinic claiming that the past three months has witnessed over 430,000 people visiting the site seeking dental treatments in Singapore. The expansion is aimed at supporting consumer choice in Singapore and will be engaging with dentists and doctors, as part of plans to triple local coverage before the end of 2016.

The main area of focus will be on dental clinics, in order to support the growth of demand for treatments like braces and dental implants, where enquiries have risen 61 per cent and 94 per cent respectively.

Commenting on the expansion, King said “We are extremely pleased to be able to support expansion into the Singapore market.  We know that private healthcare consumers in Singapore want more choice because they have told us so. We believe that by giving them all the information they need, they can make empowered choices for themselves, and for their families. By delivering comprehensive choice, we can drive up quality and service for all patients.”

Last year, Whatclinic.com made a strategic acquisition of a UK dental booking competitor, Toothpick, whose real-time booking capabilities are being integrated and rolled out for all dentists listed on WhatClinic. This is due to what King perceives as a crucial benefit for patients under time pressure in Singapore’s market.

King concluded: “Real-time booking is the future of dental care, especially for routine treatments like teeth cleaning, or for emergency dental care. That’s why, as we continue to engage with consumers and clinics, we will be investing significant engineering resources into the strategic integrations needed to support the preferred dental booking platforms of Singapore dentists.”

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Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
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Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.