AMD to buy chip peer Xilinx for $35 billion in data centre push

Semiconductor designer Advanced Micro Devices Inc (AMD) said on Tuesday it would buy Xilinx Inc in a $35 billion all-stock deal, intensifying its battle with Intel Corp in the data center chip market.

The deal, which AMD expects to close at the end of 2021, will create a combined company with 13,000 engineers and a completely outsourced manufacturing strategy that relies heavily on Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd (TSMC).

The two US firms have benefited from a more nimble approach to grab market share from Intel, which has struggled with internal manufacturing.

AMD has long been Intel’s chief rival for central processor units (CPUs) in the personal computer business.

Since Chief Executive Lisa Su took over AMD in 2014, she has focused on challenging Intel in the fast-growing business of data centers that power internet-based applications and services and are fuelling the rise of artificial intelligence and fifth-generation telecommunications networks.

Xilinx has also been working to penetrate data centers with programmable processors that help speed up specialized tasks such as compressing videos or providing digital encryption. Its primary rival in the area, Altera Corp, was scooped up by Intel for $16.7 billion in 2015 in what was then Intel’s largest-ever deal.

“There are some areas where we’re very strong, and we will be able to accelerate some of the adoption of the Xilinx product family,” Su told Reuters in an interview. “And there are some areas where (Xilinx CEO) Victor (Peng) is very strong, and we believe that we’ll be able to accelerate some of the AMD products into those markets.”

The tie-up comes at a time when Intel’s manufacturing technology has fallen years behind TSMC’s. AMD, which spun off its factories nearly a decade ago, has rocketed ahead of Intel with chips that perform better. The performance edge helped AMD gain its best market share since 2013 at slightly less than 20% of the CPU market, which has in turn pushed its shares up 79% this year.

Shares of AMD fell about 4% in premarket trading, while those of Xilinx surged over 12% after the deal was announced.

Xilinx also uses TSMC’s factories, called “fabs” in the industry, to make its chips, with both U.S. companies using modular designs that let them swap out different pieces of a chip to avoid bottlenecks or delays.

“We ended up with TSMC, and have stayed with them, not due to any contractual reason – we could go to any fab at any time – but because they are best-in-class,” Peng told Reuters in an interview. “It’s about the choices you make.”

Under the deal, Xilinx shareholders will receive about 1.7 shares of AMD common stock for each share of Xilinx common stock, valuing Xilinx at $143 per share, or about 24.8% higher than its $114.55 closing price on Oct. 26. AMD shareholders will own about 74% of the combined firm, with Xilinx shareholders owning the remaining 26%.

AMD‘s Su will lead the combined company as chief executive, with Xilinx’s Peng serving as president responsible for the Xilinx business and strategic growth initiatives. The companies expect the deal to generate $300 million in cost savings.

AMD also reported earnings on Tuesday earlier than scheduled. It reported revenue and adjusted earnings of $2.80 billion and 41 cents per share, beating Wall Street expectations of $2.57 billion and 36 cents per share, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

Bernstein analyst Stacy Rasgon said there is a danger that a major acquisition in an adjacent chip market could distract AMD‘s leadership while Intel fights to regain market share.

“The worry would be, AMD has this great self-grown story of their own, which is just starting to play out. Why are you doing this now? Is it just opportunistic? Does it distract from the current story?” he said.

Xilinx’s Peng, however, said meetings between the two companies have already revealed they have very similar methods for designing chips.

“I’ll be honest, I don’t think it’s really as challenging as some other combinations,” he said. “I had one of my leadership teams who was not familiar with AMD say to me after a meeting, ‘Boy, they’re just like us.'”

Reuters

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Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.