KKR said to rope in TPG’s Trehan to head India PE business

FILE PHOTO: Trading information for KKR & Co is displayed on a screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., August 23, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File Photo

KKR & Co. has picked Gaurav Trehan, a partner from rival buyout firm TPG, to head its private equity business in India, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

Trehan, who joined TPG in 2004, left the company this month, the people said, asking not to be identified as the information is not public. Sanjay Nayar, chief executive officer of KKR’s India unit, has been overseeing the business so far.

Private equity firms are strengthening their management teams expecting the pandemic to boost buyout opportunities in Asia’s third-largest economy. Carlyle Group Inc. is also looking for a new managing director to lead or co-lead its business in India, Bloomberg News reported last month.

KKR is predicting the coronavirus crisis will ultimately be another inflection point for its business even as its holdings take a hit. Scott Nuttall, co-president of KKR, said during an earnings call last week, that the possibilities for the firm to expand are even greater now than during the last financial crisis.

In India, KKR has invested in companies such as tower operator Bharti Infratel Ltd. and life insurer Max Financial Services Ltd., according to its website. Last year, the private equity firm acquired a majority stake in private education services provider EuroKids International Pvt. Ltd. for an undisclosed amount.

A spokesman for KKR declined to comment. Trehan couldn’t be reached.

Bloomberg

Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.

Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.