Japan’s Takeda forecasts $1.76b operating loss on Shire acquisition

Shire logos sit on the boxes of Elvanse 50mg tablets, produced by Shire Plc, left, and Mezavant XL 1200mg tablets, produced by Shire Plc, in this arranged photograph taken at a pharmacy in London, U.K., on Tuesday, July 8, 2014. Photographer: Bloomberg/Bloomberg

Takeda Pharmaceutical Co forecast on Tuesday it would have an operating loss in the current financial year, as it books costs associated with the multibillion-dollar Shire deal.

Japan’s biggest drugmaker expects an operating loss of 193 billion yen ($1.76 billion) for the year to March 2020, compared with a 205 billion yen profit a year earlier.

That compares with an average estimate for the current year of 227.5 billion yen profit from 12 analysts, compiled by Refinitiv.

Annual profit would be squeezed as Shire-related costs pile up due to re-evaluation of Shire’s inventories and fixed intangible assets, the Japanese drugmaker had flagged earlier.

The Shire acquisition, completed in January, catapulted Takeda into the world’s top 10 drugmakers by sales but also made it one of the most indebted.

Takeda agreed last week to sell its dry eye drug Xiidra to Swiss drugmaker Novartis for up to $5.3 billion, as part of a move to dispose of $10 billion worth of non-core assets to cut debt. The company also said it is selling TachoSil, a surgical patch for bleeding control, to Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon for $400 million.

In addition to these drugs, Takeda is looking to dispose Shire-originated SHP647 that treats inflammatory bowel disease after the European Commission voiced concerns about the overlap with its own drug called Entyvio.

Reuters

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In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

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  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.