Malaysia’s Top Glove says US ban on its products has hurt production

Photo by Clay Banks on Unsplash

Malaysia’s Top Glove said on Thursday its glove production has been affected because of a U.S. ban on its products over allegations they are made with forced labour.

Two units of the world’s largest producer of latex gloves were banned by the United States in July last year. And last month, U.S. authorities said the ban now extended to all disposable gloves made by Top Glove in Malaysia.

A “certain percentage” of Malaysian production has been affected because of the ban, but the impact will be temporary, Top Glove chairman Lim Wee Chai said on a call with reporters.

He did not provide detail on the extent of the impact.

The company also said it has stopped all shipments to the United States from Malaysia and that it was working “expeditiously” to resolve forced labour issues.

Ethical trade consultancy Impactt, appointed by Top Glove to assess its trade and labour practices after the U.S. ban, said last month that it had found several indicators of forced labour at the company.

As at January, Impactt said it “no longer” found indicators of forced labour among direct employees such as abuse of vulnerability, restriction of movement, excessive overtime or the withholding of wages. But it identified other areas that the company was yet to fix fully.

Reuters

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Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.