US Customs says it has found forced labour at Malaysia’s Top Glove, to seize goods

The US Customs has found forced labour practices in Top Glove Corp Bhd’s production of disposable gloves and directed its ports to seize goods from the manufacturer, it said on Monday.

In a statement overnight, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said it has sufficient information to determine labour abuses at the world’s largest medical glove maker. CBP issued an order in July last year that barred imports from two of Top Glove‘s subsidiaries on suspicion of labour abuses.

The ban now extends “to all disposable gloves originating in Top Glove factories in Malaysia,” it told Reuters.

Top Glove shares fell nearly 5% in early morning trade.

Top Glove told Reuters its US counsels are liaising with representatives from the CBP to obtain more clarity and information on the matter.

CBP said its finding does not impact the vast majority of disposable gloves imported into the United States which are critical during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“CBP has taken steps to ensure that this targeted enforcement action against Top Glove will not have a significant impact on total U.S. imports of disposable gloves,” John Leonard, CBP Acting Executive Assistant Commissioner for Trade said in the statement.

Top Glove has said in the past months that it has taken extensive rectification actions to improve its labour practices.

Ethical trade consultancy Impactt, appointed by Top Glove to assess its trade and labour practices, reported earlier this month that as at January, it “no longer” found indicators of systemic forced labour at the manufacturer.

Reuters

Singapore Reporter/s

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Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

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Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.