India: Uber rival Ola said to be seeking funds at 40% lower valuation

Bhavish Aggarwal, CEO and co-founder of Ola, an app-based cab service provider, poses in front of an Ola cab in Mumbai March 3, 2015. REUTERS/Shailesh Andrade/File Photo

India’s Ola is raising funds at a sharply reduced valuation of about $3 billion, a person with direct knowledge of the matter said, as the country’s foremost ride-hailing service tries to amass capital to stave off a challenge from Uber Technologies Inc.

If the deal goes through, Ola would become the first Indian unicorn, or billion-dollar startup, to accept funds at a lower valuation, in what’s known as a down-round. It would be 40 percent lower than the $5 billion the company was valued at after a previous round in November 2015. That made Ola one of the nation’s four most valuable startups, alongside online retailers Flipkart and Snapdeal and digital payments operator Paytm.

Ola continues to negotiate with investors as it pursues a goal of raising over $600 million this time, but it’s had to peg its expectations lower, the person said, asking not to be identified because the discussions are private. Global funding for startups is slowing and investors harbor concerns about an increasingly aggressive Uber, the world’s most valuable and best-funded technology startup.

This year is shaping up to be the roughest ever for India’s young technology companies. Foreign giants like Amazon.com Inc. and Uber have trained their sights on Asia’s third-largest economy, exacerbating intense competition. Investors have grown wary: India’s technology startups raised $4.23 billion in the first three quarters of this year, less than half the total for the same period of 2015, according to researcher Preqin. Even leading players like Flipkart are under pressure. The country’s largest online retailer has laid off hundreds after a bad run that cost its chief executive his job.

“There is still plenty of money available. However, in the last one year investors have become more cautious, discerning and are taking their time,” said Sanjeev Bikhchandani, an angel investor and vice-chairman of Info Edge (India), which owns leading job listings website Naukri.com. “The implication is that funding rounds will get smaller and valuations will be under a microscope.”

Startups are usually reluctant to accept down-rounds because of how it could depress morale and the value of existing investors’ stakes. But companies that need capital to bankroll operations may have little choice in the matter. Ola declined to comment. India’s Economic Times earlier reported Ola’s willingness to take a lower valuation.

Ola is still drawing interest from new investors, the person said. Existing backer SoftBank Group Corp. will join its upcoming round but won’t lead the fundraising, the person added. Ola’s previous investors include Tiger Global Management, DST Global, Accel Partners and Sequoia Capital. Matthew Nicholson, a spokesman for SoftBank in Tokyo, declined to comment.

It’ll need the cash. Ola, whose parent is ANI Technologies Pvt, and Uber are trying to one-up each other in one of the world’s most attractive ride-hailing arenas. Ola currently holds the upper hand in the $10 billion Indian market but Uber has been stepping up competition, via driver incentives and promotions targeted at its rival’s existing markets. The U.S. firm is ratcheting up spending in other emerging markets after ceding China to rival Didi Chuxing.

Investors in India’s largest privately funded companies — Ola, Flipkart and Snapdeal — have marked down the value of their investments this year. This month, SoftBank announced a 58.1 billion yen ($513 million) investment loss, mainly on its assets in India. SoftBank’s investments in the country include Jasper Infotech Pvt’s Snapdeal.

Bloomberg

Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.

Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.