Vietnam says Facebook should adhere to local regulations

FILE PHOTO: An internet user browses through the Vietnamese government's new Facebook page in Hanoi, Vietnam December 30, 2015. REUTERS/Kham/File Photo

Companies such as Facebook that operate in Vietnam should abide by local laws and fully implement their tax and social responsibilities in the country, Vietnam‘s foreign ministry said on Thursday.

On Tuesday, Reuters exclusively reported that Facebook’s local servers in Vietnam were taken offline in mid-February, slowing local traffic to a crawl until Facebook agreed to a government request to significantly increase the censorship of “anti-state” posts for local users in Vietnam.

Vietnam‘s guidelines are to promote the development of the internet and information and communication technology in the support of the country’s development,” foreign ministry spokesman Ngo Toan Thang told a regular news conference.

“These companies must fully implement their tax and social responsibilities,” Thang said in response to a question about the Reuters report.

Thang said that Facebook had committed to adhering to Vietnamese laws and regulations, and that Vietnam would monitor how it implemented that commitment.

“Information and communication firms should cooperate with the government of Vietnam to build a healthy and safe cyber environment,” he added.

Reuters

Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
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Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.