Malaysia to issue up to five licences to new online lenders in 2020

Visual from Bank Negara website

Malaysia‘s central bank plans to issue up to five licences to new online banks offering either conventional or Islamic banking under a proposed licensing framework set to be finalised next year.

In a draft proposal issued on Friday, the central bank said the new framework would allow for internet-based banking products and services that could address gaps in the market for potential underserved and unserved customers. The new lenders will have access to the country’s shared ATM network.

The move by Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) comes as regulators across Asia opening up banking sectors to new digital players using technology to offer financial services.

“Such digital banks are expected to offer meaningful access to and promote responsible usage of suitable and affordable financial solutions to financial consumers,” BNM said in a statement.

According to the draft proposal, “Preference will be accorded to an application where the controlling equity interest in the proposed licensed digital bank resides with Malaysians.”

The banks would also need to demonstrate their viability in the first three to five years of operations, with an asset threshold of not more than 2 billion ringgit ($484.4 million) during the period.

The central bank will finalise its policy document on the new lenders during the first half of 2020 after gathering feedback on the proposed framework. Applications for licences would be opened after the policy document is issued.

Reuters

Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.

Singapore Reporter/s

In Singapore, we are looking to double our reporting team by this year-end to comprehensively cover the fast-moving world of funded startups and VC, PE & M&A deals. We want reporters who can tell our readers what is really happening in these sectors and why it matters to markets, companies and consumers. The ability to write precisely and urgently is crucial for these roles. Ideal candidates must have to ability to work in a collaborative, dynamic, and fast-changing environment. We want our new hires to be digitally savvy and ready to experiment with new forms of storytelling. Most importantly, we are looking for hard-hitting reporters who work well in a team. Collaboration and collegiality are a must.

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).

Following vacancies can be applied for (only in Singapore).   

  • A reporter to track companies/startups that have raised private capital, and have the potential to become unicorns. SEA currently has over 40 companies with a valuation of over $100 million and under $1 billion.
  • A reporter who can get behind the scenes and reveal how funding rounds are put together, or why they’ve failed to materialise. She/he in this role will largely focus on long-format stories. 
  • A journalist to track special situations funds, distressed debt and private credit (from the PE angle) across Asia.